Part 3: Blocking Bad Hosts – Blocking Them, Easily (CLI Edition)

In part two, I showed you how to use the Local Security Policy GUI to block the bad guys. There were a lot of pretty pictures for those that prefer the GUI. In this version, I’ll show you how to accomplish the same thing from the command line. This is my preferred method.  It is much simpler to automate and explain.

By following the steps below, you will be able to create a new policy and manage the filter lists and actions. The goal here will be to put all these pieces together into a nice tidy package that is fully automated.

The policy you create in this tutorial will not be applied to the system until you “Assign” the policy in Step 6. As long as the policy is not assigned, you can safely edit, add, remove, etc. rules and sets to the policy without affecting the system. Note: double and triple check your sets to ensure you do not block legitimate traffic before assigning the policy.

To begin this tutorial, open the command prompt. If you don’t know how, you probably shouldn’t be doing this. All commands meant to be typed are in italics.

Step 1: Create IP Security Policy

netsh ipsec static add policy description=”This policy blocks all traffic to hosts/nets associated with it.”

Step 2: Create an IP Filter List

netsh ipsec static add filterlist description=”This filter list contains hosts and networks known to host malware, criminal activity, etc.”

Step 3: Create IP Filters and Associate them with the Filter List (Repeat this step until all hosts you wish to block have been entered)

Single IP (10.254.254.254/32)

netsh ipsec static add filter filterlist=”Bad Hosts” srcaddr=10.254.254.254 dstaddr=any description=”John Smith. 12/31/2015. Brute force logon attempts to: SERVER01″

Subnet (10.254.254.0/24)

netsh ipsec static add filter filterlist=”Bad Hosts” srcaddr=10.254.254.0 dstaddr=any srcmask=24 description=”John Smith. 12/31/2015. Brute force logon attempts to: SERVER01″

Network Range (10.254.254.2-10)

netsh ipsec static add filter filterlist=”Bad Hosts” srcaddr=10.254.254.2-10.254.254.15 dstaddr=any description=”John Smith. 12/31/2015. Brute force logon attempts to: SERVER01″

Step 4: Create a Filter Action

netsh ipsec static add filteraction description=”This action blocks all traffic.” action=block

Step 5: Create Policy Rule to apply Filter Action to Filter List

netsh ipsec static add rule policy=”Blocked Traffic” filterlist=”Bad Hosts” filteraction=”Block All Traffic” activate=yes

Step 6: Assigning (and un-assigning) the Policy

This step will apply all the settings you have created up to this point. Double and triple check that you did not enter a valid host or network or it will be blocked. If fact, if you have any doubts in your mind, do not do this step until another person (who knows what they are doing) looks over your work too! Note: This is one place MS will not give you a little “are you sure you want to do this” type of warning. As soon as you assign the policy, it is done.

Assign

netsh ipsec static set policy name=”Blocked Traffic” assign=yes

Un-assign

netsh ipsec static set policy assign=no

2 comments

  1. Mark says:

    Hi Andrew,

    Thank you very much for sharing.
    I’ve been searching for something like this.

    On a 2008R2 / Win7 box you need to give a name with step 1
    name=”Blocked Traffic” but I assume you knew that 😉

Comments are closed.